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Astonishing Ant-Man #1

ASTONISHING ANT-MAN #1

Capsule Review

Tries very hard — maybe too hard. Or maybe just too eager. Packs a lot into one issue — Scott Lang has moved to a new city, has a new job, has a cranky boss, has wacky sidekicks. He pines away for his estranged teenage daughter. There’s a mastermind villain, who meets with another mastermind villain, who unleashes a third villain on our hero, right when he is have a back-and-forth with a client and arguing with yet another supporting character. It feels like writer Nick Spencer is trying to do too much — which is a criticism I don’t often level at books in this age of decompressed storytelling — but when you have page after page of six-panel layouts, all laden with heavy word balloons in service of gonzo dialogue that doesn’t always land, it can feel that the story is in a hurry to get nowhere, fast. Follows on the tone of the Ant-Man movie, which is welcome and a good idea, but I’d trade all this book’s many supporting characters for one Michael Peña. Ramon Rosanas’ art is serviceable, when you can see it beneath all the word balloons!

Approachability For New Readers

There’s a lot to take in, but the scene is set and fans of the movie will be on familiar ground. It works.

Read #2?

Much potential here, but it falls just short of my pull list.

Sales Rank

#22 October

Read more about Ant-Man at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

 

Astonishing Ant-Man #1

Captain America: Sam Wilson #1

CAPTAIN AMERICA: SAM WILSON #1

Capsule Review

Wings-and-a-shield is … not a great look. But this book as a whole looks just great. Artist Daniel Acuña strikes a middle ground between comic book and cartoonist style, resulting in serviceable action and superior facial expressions for a score of characters who are all unique and full of personality. The colors — which I assume Acuña did himself — are also light, nuanced, and inviting. Writer Nick Spencer gives us a Sam Wilson who adheres to his social worker roots by sticking up for the little guy, adeptly pitting him against the racist Sons of the Serpent, who are here mobilized as a vigilante patrol on America’s southern border. This new Cap isn’t nearly so well-connected as the old — in this issue alone he gets thrown off the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier, and has to fly commercial … in the middle seat no less! Loved seeing Misty Knight as part of Sam’s supporting cast, and any book that gets Breitbart.com into a lather can’t be all bad!

Approachability For New Readers

Not so great. There’s a little text slug on the first page telling us that Sam Wilson has become the new Captain America, but there’s quite a bit of unexamined continuity leading into this tale.

Read #2?

Yep!

Sales Rank

#31 October

Read more about Captain America at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

 

Captain America: Sam Wilson #1

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