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Doctor Strange vs. Dracula!

Longbox Graveyard #164

Super-Blog Team-Up returns with a Doctor Strange-driven look at magic in comics! Now, Halloween was last week, so I’m a couple days late for Dracula, but with his movie out this week, I’m right on time for Doctor Strange … and it’s always time for Bronze Age Marvel here at Longbox Graveyard. So let’s jump right in as Doctor Strange battles Dracula, Lord of Vampires!

Tomb of Dracula #44

This two-part crossover began in Tomb of Dracula #44, smack-dab in the middle of the classic run by Marv Wolfman, Gene Colan, and Tom Palmer. I’ve sung the praises of Tomb of Dracula here at Longbox Graveyard before (twice!) — it really might have been the finest Marvel comic of its age. And one of the reasons the book worked so well was that writer and editor Marv Wolfman largely kept Dracula and his tales sequestered from the rest of the Marvel Universe. While Drac would encounter Spider-Man and Thor in other titles, Marv jealously guarded the door of Dracula’s own book, ceding to editorial pressure to more closely connect Tomb of Dracula with the Marvel Universe only through crossovers with otherworldly and supernatural characters like Silver Surfer, Brother Voodoo, and (in our case) Doctor Strange!

The first part of the tale, written by Marv Wolfman, opened with Strange mourning the death of his faithful manservant, Wong, beneath the flashing fangs of a vampire!

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

Just look at Gene Colan’s smokey pencils, beautifully illuminated by Tom Palmer’s perfect inks! There’s never been a better team for supernatural comics storytelling!

But this wasn’t just any vampire — this was Dracula, the Lord of Vampires, as Strange discovered when his sorcery allowed him to experience Wong’s final moments.

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

Harnessing the fathomless powers of the All-Seeing Eye of Agamotto (which then, as now, could do about anything the writer needed it to do), Doctor Strange tracked the “life-patterns” of Dracula from the scene of the crime to Dracula’s lair in Boston.

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

I love how Colan’s “camera” pushes in on Dracula, starting with his open coffin, then Dracula in repose, and then Dracula alert to Strange’s intrusion. Looking at this sequence, did you “see” Dracula’s eyes snap open between the last two panels? That’s the magic of comics, boys and girls — like Scott McCloud noted, comics are as much about what you don’t see between the panels as what you see in the panels themselves.

After that? Well, it’s on!

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

But this battle between Dracula and Strange wasn’t the usual Marvel Comics Fist City beat-down, and it wasn’t even a garden-variety Doctor Strange ectoplasmic duel of ghosts.

No, to battle Dracula, Strange invoked the “Images of Ikonn” to delve into Dracula’s “passions and fears,” taking Dracula back to the moment his mortal self fell on the battlefield in a cavalry duel with Turkish invaders.

It’s kind of dirty pool, to be honest.

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

For a couple panels, there, we could almost sympathize with Dracula, and this was intentional. Marv Wolfman considered Dracula the “protagonist” of Tomb of Dracula, rather than the hero, but as readers we still needed to get on board with Dracula, and moments like this served to humanize him. We see Dracula as a mortal terrified of his pending (un)death, we see his noble sacrifice in defense of his homeland, and can kind of feel bad for him … but it doesn’t take much for Dracula to revert to form, showing the dark side of his noble nature with his incredulity that this conflict originated with the death of “… a mere hireling … a cretinous menial … a whimpering domestic.”

(Don’t take a job with Dracula, folks).

Taken aback by Dracula’s sudden recovery — and reluctant to use his “more potent magics” for fear of rendering Dracula incapable of restoring Wong to life — Doctor Strange was quickly mesmerized by Dracula.

Mesmerized … and slain!

Tomb of Dracula #44 by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer

How’s that for a vintage Marvel shock ending? Doctor Strange is dead? Say it isn’t so!

Fortunately, we needn’t wait even one week to see how this one turns out … the tale continued in Doctor Strange #14!

Doctor Strange #14

While this issue was written by Steve Englehart (who firmly put his stamp on the story, as we shall see), the book was illustrated by the self-same team of Colan and Palmer, and also edited by Marv Wolfman, resulting in an unusually coherent crossover, at least by Marvel standards.

The issue opened with Dracula gloating over his fallen foe, casting Strange’s body into a dungeon, where he might rot until rising, three days later, as Dracula’s undead slave.

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

But in his arrogance, Dracula didn’t reckon that Doctor Strange might be “no stranger to death,” as we learn that Strange escaped death by leaving his body instants before Dracula killed him at the end of last issue. But now, Strange was trapped outside his body, in astral form, with only three days to concoct a solution to his dilemma.

So what did Strange do?

Why, he thought, of course!

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

But all the thinking in the world didn’t solve Doc’s trouble. After trying to distract Dracula with visions and spells — and nearly catching Dracula out in the daylight — Strange was still a helpless, disembodied spectator when Dracula returned three days later. But Dracula was taking no chances, and in an odd reversal of roles, he sought to put a final end to the undead Doctor Strange with a stake through the heart!

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

Right on cue, Strange rose as a vampire, and we finally got some fist-and-fang action, as Dracula battled with a thing that was not-quite-Strange: Doctor Strange’s body, given in to dark vampiric impulses, while Strange’s conscience was helpless to intervene.

And it didn’t take long for Dracula to gain the upper hand against a Doctor Strange reduced to bestial impulses.

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

I love it when Drac calls someone a “clod.” If your boss calls you a clod — or “cretin,” another favorite — then he’s probably a super-villian

It’s when Dracula had Doctor Strange on the ropes that something intriguing and even a little profound occurred. When Dracula asserted himself as “Lord” while strangling the life from Strange, from the depths of his possessed soul, Doctor Strange called on the power of the Christian god to save his life!

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

It’s a bold turn of events, and something Steve Englehart didn’t shy away from — he once featured God Himself in a Doctor Strange story, then authored a bogus fan letter to deflect scrutiny — but what’s most interesting to me about this moment is what it asks about Doctor Strange’s own spirituality.

Does Doctor Strange believe in the Christian god, or is He just another deity in the Rolodex, to be invoked like Cyttorak or Vishanti? In his moment of greatest extremis, it is the Christian god that Strange turns to for salvation. Is Strange a man of faith, or is he just happy to use the best tool at hand?

Either way, that cross-like burst of light sure did the job …

Doctor Strange #14, by Englehart, Colan, and Palmer

Strange’s body and soul become one again even as Dracula is sent down to defeat, but Englehart implies that the will and even the cruelty required to overcome Dracula’s evil doesn’t come entirely from the divine force Strange invoked — that the “… true Dr. Strange would find no pleasure in his (Dracula’s) pain … that his tormentor (Strange) has been touched with Dracula’s own evil …” This conclusion points to an (ahem) strange duality, with the power of God getting Strange back on his feet, but Dracula’s own dark power of evil being the special sauce that let Strange finish the deed and kill Dracula for all time.

(Or at least until the next issue of Tomb of Dracula!)

And with Strange’s (and Wong’s) souls miraculously restored through Dracula’s death (could Drac have died for their sins? Nah …), that brings this tale to a close, and with it this installment of Longbox Graveyard!

It’s been awhile since I posted here, and it feels good! I hope to make this a more regular occurrence — please let me know what you think of this story and Steve Englehart’s Strange cosmology in the comments section below!

But, before you go — it took the awesome power of Super-Blog Team-Up to wake Longbox Graveyard from its Odinsleep … assuming you view this as a welcome development, please pay your thanks forward by visiting these other Super-Blog Team-Up articles, all looking at some form of “Strange” Magic!

Super-Blog Team-Up: Magic!

NEXT: #165 I Shopped At An Amazon Brick And Mortar Book Store

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International Iron Man #1

INTERNATIONAL IRON MAN #1

Capsule Review

This book teams Brian Michael Bendis with his old Daredevil running mate, Alex Maleev, and so it is going to be a love-it-or-hate-it-affair. In its favor, you get solid dialogue, an intriguing new take on Tony Stark, and plenty of emotion and mood through Maleev’s art. On the other hand, you get that Bendis/Maleev explosion-in-the-word-balloon-factory style of storytelling, plus it is going to cost you four bucks a month for the next year to get the whole tale. Despite my early reservations, I have come to appreciate this team’s style, and I enjoyed this latest Iron Man book, though there is precious little Iron Man in it — aside from the opening and the coda, Iron Man is a distant dream in this story, which concentrates on a fateful meeting during Tony Stark’s pre-heroic college days. There are a lot of talking heads and only a little action, but the characters are authentic and the plot does move forward, at least by Bendis standards. It is an unconventional take on Tony but Bendis pulls it off, and he has earned some credit — the work he is doing right now makes most of Marvel’s other writers look like they are playing with Tinkertoys.

Approachability For New Readers

Fine. Bendis has a cinematic sensibility, and while his story starts in the middle, he catches you up with the who, what, and why as he goes along.

Read #2?

Sure … when it is collected.

Sales Rank

(N/A)

Note

Seeing as my All-New All-Different review project began with an Iron Man book, this latest Iron Man book seems a good place to bring the project to a close. Thanks to everyone that stuck with me through these better than 60 (!) reviews, and keep an eye on Longbox Graveyard for a summary post about my experience with Marvel’s latest relaunch, coming soon!

Read more about Iron Man at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling relaunch.

International Iron Man #1

 

Hyperion #1

HYPERION #1

Capsule Review

With all due respect to creators Chuck Wendig and Nik Varella, does anyone want a Hyperion book? Has anyone ever wanted a Hyperion book? I ask because in an age where New Avengers sells less than 20K copies a month, giving Hyperion his own book sure seems like shoving an orphan into the storm. Marvel is shining a spotlight on the Squadron, for whatever reason … in addition to their new Squadron Supreme series, we are getting a Nighthawk book in a couple weeks. It is strange, but I suppose I shouldn’t fault Marvel for trying. I do fault Marvel for not trying harder. This new Hyperion book isn’t terrible, but it is nowhere near outstanding enough to break out in this market. For those not in the know, Hyperion is Marvel’s answer to Superman, a relic of an unauthorized Avengers vs. JLA pastiche from decades ago. Here we join Hyperion as he dons a trucker cap to drive across the country and fume and ruminate about his Squadron pals. He picks up a girl on the run and then collides with the Hills Have Eyes carney rednecks that are hot on her heels. This is a perfectly adequate book with a couple mild surprises, but I tell you … I felt the shadow of cancellation before I was a quarter of the way through the book. I can’t see new readers jumping on board with this story, and die-hard Hyperion fans (both of them) will find their hero nearly unrecognizable here.

Approachability For New Readers

There is a wordy explanation of Hyperion and his backstory on the title page. It does the job.

Read #2?

No, thanks.

Sales Rank

(N/A)

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

 

Hyperion #1

Mockingbird #1

MOCKINGBIRD #1

Capsule Review

This unexpected series promises to reward repeat reading — according to the text feature, it is deliberately designed as a four-issue “puzzle box,” with your impression of this first issue changing over time as each of the succeeding issues is read. But the first issue works fine all by itself, and maybe it isn’t wise to look too far ahead, with a few books of this latest Marvel relaunch getting the axe after just five or six issues. Live in the now! Mockingbird does, and that’s part of her problem, given that her “now” involves submitting to annoying and invasive medical tests by S.H.I.E.L.D. every week … and her doctors may not be telling her everything that is going on. Not by a long shot. All of which sounds a lot more grim than it is — this is actually a fast-paced, humorous, and light-hearted book, with writer Chelsea Cain letting us in on Mockingbird’s sarcastic inner monologue, and artist Kate Niemczyk scattering blistering little visual Easter eggs all over the place (yes, that is Tony Stark reading a STD pamphlet in the S.H.I.E.L.D. medical waiting room). This is a unique and entertaining book that deserves your support — don’t sleep on Mockingbird!

Approachability For New Readers

Pretty good. It helps to know a bit about Mockingbird’s past relationships and associations, but it’s easy enough to figure it out as you go along.

Read #2?

Yup. I need to know where the dog comes from.

Sales Rank

(N/A)

Read more about the Avengers at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling relaunch.

Mockingbird #1

 

Black Widow #1

BLACK WIDOW #1

Capsule Review

“Cinematic” is an over-used term in comics, but it certainly applies here. How about, “relentlessly visual?” Mark Waid and Chris Samnee share the writer’s credit in Natasha’s latest solo effort, and that credit is well-earned, with every twist-and-turn a visual one, right down to a harrowing escape by the Black Widow that harkens back to one of the greatest visual reveals in Marvel Comics history. Really, the story comes down to this: the Black Widow has done something bad, S.H.I.E.L.D. is out to get here, and everything else is details. But what details! We get tightly-choreographed fist fights, motorcycle chases, skydiving hijinks, spy gadgets, and even the S.H.I.E.L.D. commissary in a breakneck, all-action story where our hero doesn’t utter a word until the very last page. In the text feature, Mark Waid makes much of how everyone wanted to keep the old Daredevil team together, including colorist Matt Wilson and letterer Joe Caramagna — and this is the work of a team that thoroughly understands each other, operating at the peak of their powers. You can read the book in about five minutes … but that just leaves time to go back and read it again. And again! (I will).

Approachability For New Readers

Given her presence in several of the biggest superhero films of all time, I think it is safe to say most fans will know that Black Widow is a super-spy … and you don’t need to know a lot more than that to enjoy this story.

Read #2?

Absolutely.

Sales Rank

(N/A)

Read more about the Avengers at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling relaunch.

 

Black Widow #1

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