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Old Man Logan #1

OLD MAN LOGAN #1

Capsule Review

Wolverine is back from that depressing Mad Max/Old West alternate future where the bad guys won and a T-Rex runs around in a Venom suit. He’s disoriented and mad as hell. His future was filled with Very Bad People, and Logan is determined to do Very Bad Things to them here in his past, to make sure those later Very Bad Things never come to pass. Writer Jeff Lemire’s script sets up more like a limited series than a continuing run, with Logan having a hit list and maybe an issue or so to scratch each name off of it. (Considering some of the names on that list, I don’t see how this ends with anything but a fake-out). They’re going for a spaghetti western vibe but I thought the pace a bit too languid; artist Andrea Sorrentino borrows that distinctive Sergio Leone color palette but I found his pencils too rough-hewn, even for a post-apocalypse book. Sorrentino does some nice work with small inset panels emphasizing small actions, like Logan getting ready to pop his claws (or not), and I liked the two-page homage to Frank Miller’s Dark Knight, but overall it was just a bit too craggy for me. I guess they don’t mark these books as being for “mature readers” anymore, but this would qualify, if that’s your thing. (It isn’t mine).

Approachability For New Readers

Pretty disorienting. I read the original series way back when, so I could fill in the blanks, but you are pretty much on your own.

Read #2?

Nah … I don’t much like this nakedly murderous Wolverine.

Sales Rank

#6 January

Read more about the X-Men at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

Old Man Logan #1

 

Extraordinary X-Men #1

EXTRAORDINARY X-MEN #1

Capsule Review

Top-shelf work from writer Jeff Lemire and artist Humberto Ramos, with a special Longbox Graveyard commendation to colorist Edgar Delgado, who really made these big pages come alive (the two-page spread of Colossus working his Russian farm stopped me dead). An endearing strength of the X-Men is how the core concept can stand up to almost all narrative violence. Here the X-Men are assembling a new team in a world even more threatening than before, where Terrigen mist is killing and sterilizing mutants, and the unspecified past sins of an absent Cyclops have once again turned the world against our heroes. Professor X is seen only as a ghost, Jean Grey is a teenager, Wolverine is an old man … but it all works, in its crazy way, and I am encouraged to see the core membership of this team draws on the most iconic characters of X-Men past. Yes, it is a bit of a jumble, but beneath it all the X-Men are still the X-Men — characters you recognize, fighting the good fight against intolerance, striking from the shadows and feeling like the world is collapsing in on them. Love it!

Approachability For New Readers

As good as it ever gets with the X-Men, which is to say, “not very.” Working out past histories and relationships is part-and-parcel of the X-Men experience, and this book is no exception. But this is a good jumping-on point — a new status quo is explained, a new team is mustered, and there are enough familiar faces from movies and comics past that even brand new readers will find something to latch onto.

Read #2?

Yes!

Sales Rank

(#5 November)

Read more about the X-Men at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

Extraordinary X-Men #1

 

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