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All-New Inhumans #1

ALL-NEW INHUMANS #1

Capsule Review

I don’t think anyone asked for two (or three?) Inhumans books, but with Marvel set on grooming the line to replace the X-Men (lost for the time-being to Fox), we’re going to get the Inhumans whether we like it or not. Resistance is futile! All-New Inhumans lays down more of the X-Men-Meets-Game-of-Thrones storytelling DNA that is supposed to characterize this bold new franchise initiative, and the results are muddled, though superior to the thrown-together-feeling Uncanny Inhumans. Here we follow the attempt to deal with the sudden explosion of Inhuman population by the fractured Inhuman royal family. A Terrigen mist cloud is wandering the earth, spawning new superhumans in its wake, and leaving a trail of chaos as those heroes come into their powers (and run up against the kind of mutants-go-home fear and intolerance that’s been a staple of X-Men books for decades). James Asmus and Charles Soule’s script runs to the wordy side, and there is a confusing line-up of new characters and situations to absorb, but the central story of a familiar character in Crystal finding herself thrust forward as Inhumans ambassador to the whole planet holds things together (mostly). Stefano Caselli’s art is sketchier than I like, but he draws expressions well enough, and the storytelling is pretty solid — no mean feat for a script with this many moving parts. Reading the book at times felt like work, but if the Inhumans are moving in and you’re a regular Marvel guy, it’s work you should probably do.

Approachability For New Readers

Hard going. They’re trying real hard to get across needed exposition without being expository, and it is going to take several issues to play out. But this does have the sense of the New Normal for Marvel, and I doubt it is going to get any easier to jump on later (though reading these books in collected form might be the best approach).

Read #2?

Borderline … but yes. Eventually. When I can binge through a pile.

Sales Rank

#27 December

Read more about the Inhumans at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

 

All-New Inhumans #1

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Daredevil #1

DAREDEVIL #1

Capsule Review

A good start on another new direction for Matt Murdock, a character who has had his share through the years. Daredevil is back to his gritty roots, battling street-level mobsters and even taking on a partner … not the Black Widow, sadly, but instead a rookie hero with a stealth suit named Blind Spot, which (yes) is a little on-the-nose, but it works. (Seeing his master-and-apprentice relationship with Matt, I was reminded that while Frank Miller wrote Daredevil as a kind of shadow Batman, he never gave Matt a Robin … and now, here you go). I like that Matt is now a prosecutor, because it sets up all sorts of conflicts. How will a crusader like Matt accepting letting a bad guy cop to a lesser charge and walk free on time served to preserve the D.A.’s conviction rate? (As Daredevil, he’s going to be sorely tempted to kneecap guys in the alley as they leave the courthouse). Gets off to a rousing start with one of the best splash pages of Marvel’s reboot, which leads to a literal splash as Daredevil dives off a bridge to rescue a mob informant — a nice bit of business that reminds us that Daredevil truly is a man without fear. Writer Charles Soule seems more at home here than in his Inhumans books, with a nice feel for Daredevil’s powers and (more importantly) limitations. Artist Ron Garney renders the world with rough edges, but it fits. Might be the rare book that works better as a serial read rather than a collection — Matt Milla’s desaturated palette is moody in small chunks, but would wear me out in back-to-back reads. The bad guy is a new one on me, and I bet he could play Rachmaninov like no one’s business.

Approachability For New Readers

Pretty good. Picks you up and carries along.

Read #2?

Yes!

Sales Rank

#12 December

Read more about Daredevil at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

 

Daredevil #1

Uncanny Inhumans #1

UNCANNY INHUMANS #1

Capsule Review

I am perennially intrigued by the Inhumans, but have yet to really spark to one of their series, and this latest take is no exception. I love Black Bolt and Medusa, and this book’s deep dive into Inhuman pre-history and the emerging role of Inhumans in the outside world should be right in my wheelhouse, but I found the story less than the sum-of-its-parts. Maybe it needed more Lockjaw. (Maybe it needed ANY Lockjaw!). I’m not sold on the editorial shotgun marriage of the Inhumans with refugee characters from the X-Men and the Fantastic Four (but at least Johnny Storm has a long history here). Steve McNiven’s art was a bit stiffer than I recall from his Captain America days. Charles Soule did an admirable job with a complicated story, but his dialogue was a little expository in places — the consequence of everyone calling everyone else by their names, which benefits new readers but is clunky to the ear. (Jim Shooter used to be able to pull off that kind of dialogue better than anybody). I will say this for the book, though — it has a great appearance by Kang the Conquerer, who has always been a C-list bad guy, but the seeds are sown here to recast him as someone truly memorable.

Approachability For New Readers

So-so. The Inhumans have a complicated history and this book doesn’t run from any of it. You will be at least a little lost.

Read #2?

Pass.

Sales Rank

#17 October

Read more about the Inhumans at Longbox Graveyard

Read more capsule reviews of Marvel’s All-New All-Different rolling reboot.

Uncanny Inhumans #1

 

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