Advertisements

Blog Archives

Perfect Page: Amazing Spider-Man

I’ve been reading more contemporary comics lately — and my last post about Perfect Pages referenced a book published in the current century (gasp!) — but just to prove I haven’t ceded my classic comics bona fides, I present a perfect page from 1966!

Amazing Spider-Man #41

The page above is from Amazing Spider-Man #41, featuring the first appearance of the Rhino, written by Stan Lee, pencils by John Romita, inks by Mike Esposito (credited here as M. Demeo), and lettered by Artie Simek.

Whereas my previous Perfect Page lauded the creators for using the comics form to engage the senses in a unique way, the page above is all about bread-and-butter superhero storytelling. John Romita was still getting his feet under him after taking over Spider-Man from Steve Ditko, but on this page he shows why he would come to be considered the top Spider-Man artist of all time.

Two things, in particular, leap off this page for me.

First, Keyframing — Romita choses two great bookends for this three-panel action sequence, and they are perfectly framed: Rhino crashes into the phone booth, and Rhino smashes the street light. Each shows us what the characters do best in this fight — Rhino runs into things, and Spidey gets out of his way. The middle panel is a needed rest beat between the extremes, but Romita still works in Rhino throwing a telephone at our hero — a great middle-point in a one-two-three visual combination, and the pivot point of a page where the first and last panels offer an “in” and and “out” for the action.

Second, Continuity — The panels clearly lead one-to-the next, allowing the reader to effortlessly follow the story. Rhino smashes into the phone booth while Spidey leaps to the street light/Rhino recovers while Spidey taunts him from his supposed place of safety/Rhino smashes into the street light while Spidey scrambles out of the way. It is a perfect three-beat sequence, showing off the characters and what they do, with a power-exchange between Rhino and Spidey in each panel — smash/taunt/smash. Great visual rhythm and dead-on characterization!

I’ll even raise my hand in favor of two storytelling techniques that have fallen out of favor as the comics form has evolved — big, bold sound effects, and thought balloons. I love how STOMP! is repeated on this page (and throughout this issue) as the Rhino’s audio calling card. The placement of STOMP! in that first panel is especially adept, emphasizing the heavy fall of the Rhino’s feet, and anchoring the character as he crashes into the phone booth. (Does your mind’s eye fill in a CRASH sound effect when Rhino hits that glass? — mine does). Spidey’s thought balloons aren’t completely necessary, but they do add context to the easily-overlooked police alarm sound effect in the first panel, and they serve as a ticking clock in the second panel, reminding us that Spider-Man is trying to keep his more powerful foe off-balance until help can arrive, which adds urgency to the scene.

I also like Stan Lee’s scripting on this page. We know that Rhino looks ridiculous … and Stan knows that we know … so he lets us into the gag by hanging a lampshade on it and having Spidey mock Rhino’s costume. Sublime.

And just because I think it’s awesome, here’s Jazzy John’s cover for the issue:

Amazing Spider-Man #41, John Romita

They don’t make ’em like they used to!

Advertisements

Longbox Graveyard Podcast: Top Ten Issues of Amazing Spider-Man

With The Amazing Spider-Man 2 opening this week, there’s no better time to revisit one of the most popular episodes of the Longbox Graveyard Podcast.

Amazing Spider-Man #50, John Romita

Mark Ginocchio of Chasing Amazing Blog was my special guest for this episode, where we counted down his Top 10 issues of Amazing Spider-Man!

 

Click here to listen!

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

Marvel’s greatest super-hero returns to cinemas this week in The Amazing Spider-Man 2!

I infamously left Spider-Man off my list of Top Ten Marvel Characters, but even I must acknowledge that Spidey is Marvel’s greatest creation … and while I might run hot-and-cold on Spidey, you wouldn’t be able to from the many times ol’ Web-Head has been featured here at Longbox Graveyard!

To help whip you into a frenzy for Spider-Man’s second (fifth?) movie, here are links to Longbox Graveyard’s coverage of the Amazing Spider-Man!

I took an affectionate look at the original Steve Ditko/Stan Lee run of Amazing Spider-Man HERE. There’s no doubt in my mind about who put the “amazing” in Amazing Spider-Man!

Amazing Fantasy #15

You can get a close look at the expressive faces of Steve Ditko’s Spider-Man HERE. You’ll find more Steve Ditko — along with John Romita and other classic Spidey artists, in my Spider-Man Gallery.

We’ve also taken an in-depth look at Spider-Man’s many battles and enemies, which is especially on-topic as this new picture is set to introduce the Sinister Six! Just this week I ran a Gallery of Spider-Man’s most spectacular foesMark Ginocchio of Chasing Amazing Blog counted down his Top Ten Spider-Man battles (Part 1, Part 2), and offered up a “Bottom 10” of Spider-Man’s Bronze Age villains, while I reviewed the first appearance of one of Spidey’s signature foes in another early Lee/Ditko landmark in “Face-To-Face With … The Lizard!”

Amazing Spider-Man #6, Steve Ditko

But Mark wasn’t done! He also joined me on the Longbox Graveyard Podcast to count down his Top 10 issues of Amazing Spider-Man, and provided a very popular look at the unique friendship between Spider-Man and Marvel’s other Silver Age teen idol — the Human Torch.

Spidey Torch 10

Finally, I’m of the firm opinion that Spider-Man’s greatness lies beneath this mask, which is why I was delighted to host Superior Spider-Talk’s Dan Gvozden’s look at Peter Parker’s love life (Part 1, Part 2) … and with things almost certain to go rough for poor Gwen in the new movie, you might want to review Dan’s list for insight on who will be the female lead in The Amazing Spider-Man 3!

Enjoy the movie!

%d bloggers like this: