Author Archives: Paul O'Connor

“Z” Is For …

… Zot! (1984)

And this is a total cheat — I’ve never read Zot! I bought the omnibus for my kid, though. That’s as close as I got!

Have I missed something great in the key of Z?

Let me know in the comments, below!

Check out the complete Longbox Graveyard Comics A-To-Z HERE!

And join me back here tomorrow as I wrap-up the month-long trip through the comic book alphabet.


“Y” Is For …

… Young Justice! (1998)

As we get to the end of the alphabet, I find myself stretching the definition of the idea for this series.

Sure, there’s a Young Justice comic series. I’ve heard good things about it. But I haven’t read it — my affection for Young Justice owes entirely to the animated series. It died an untimely death, but is coming back for another season. Unfortunately, it will stream exclusively on Bluetooth wireless smart refrigerator networks (or some equally-obscure service Warners is trying to get on its feet) so I guess it might as well still be cancelled to me.

Am I missing a great “Y” book? Shout it out!

Read more about Young Justice at Longbox Graveyard:

Check out the complete Longbox Graveyard Comics A-To-Z HERE!

“X” Is For …

… The X-Men and the Micronauts! (1984)

Far and away the best X-title Marvel every produced!

Nah, who am I kidding? I forgot this series as soon as I read it. I list it here just to fill out the letter and to get a little face-time for my beloved Micronauts.

There are an absolute blizzard of “X” books, nearly all of them mutant books from Marvel. I’ve already confessed by love for Uncanny X-Men — now you need to tell me which (if any) of the auxillery X-books I should read. I’m sure there is a pony somewhere in that pile.

X-press yourself, in the comments section below!

Check out the complete Longbox Graveyard Comics A-To-Z HERE!

“W” Is For …

… Warlock! (1972)

Since I already picked Captain Marvel earlier in this blog series, there’s really no choice but to book-end things with Jim Starlin’s other cosmic hero — Warlock.

I suppose that Thanos is really Starlin’s most important cosmic character. Warlock and Captain Marvel share Thanos as a nemesis, and Thanos has far eclipsed them both in the popular imagination, and getting built up as the Big Bad of Marvel’s movie franchise. I have my hopes that Warlock will soon pop from that cocoon we saw at the end of the last Guardians movie, but whoever shows up on screen will likely have little to do with the fabulous space hippie that Jim Starlin made his own in this brief 1970s series, picking up where his Captain Marvel run left off, and replacing much of Cap’s action with romance and Hamlet-like dramatics. If Captain Marvel was a superhero book set in space, Warlock was a full-on space opera, and if the series bottomed out with space sharks, it also gave us a great and boundry-pushing run as Warlock took on his own future self in the form of a power-mad cosmic messiah.

Pip the Troll was awesome, too.

There are doubtless better “W” books out there, but Warlock is my favorite. How about you?

Honorable Mentions:

  • The Walking Dead (2003)
  • Werewolf by Night (1972)
  • Warlord (1976)
  • Wonder Woman (1942)
  • Wonder Woman (1987)
  • World’s Finest Comics (1941)
  • Watchmen (1986)

Read more about Warlock at Longbox Graveyard:

Check out the complete Longbox Graveyard Comics A-To-Z HERE!

“V” Is For …

… Vison! (2015)

The mid-70s Vision was one of the very favorite characters of my era, and I don’t think he ever quite recovered from the abuse he took in West Coast Avengers, but Tom King’s reVISIONist take on the character was the best thing Marvel has put out in years.

The Vision seems to work best in ensemble books. As a member of the 1970s Avengers, he was as watchable as Mr. Spock on the bridge of the Enterprize. Also, like Spock, the Vision was at his best when juxtaposed with emotional, flesh-and-blood characters that could misjudge him, come to respect him, and even love him. In this series, the Vision is again part of an ensemble, but this time the ensemble is his family, and it is the Vision himself — attempting to fit into human society as a government worker living in the suburbs — who is the “normal” guy. At least, he’s a guy who tries very, very hard to be normal — or if not normal, then at least unexceptional. In this he fails, and it is spectacular.

A thoughtful series that stands on its own. Pick up a collected edition and enjoy.

Tell me how you feel about the Vision, in any incarnation, or hit me with your own “V” books in the comments section!

Honorable Mention:

Read more about the Vision at Longbox Graveyard:

Check out the complete Longbox Graveyard Comics A-To-Z HERE!

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